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POEM: the mention of mermaids

April 30, 2013

As promised, for National Poetry Month and to complete the unfinished challenge by Anita Abbasi…I finished a sonnet.

It was hella hard!

And I didn’t even bother with iambic pentameter (I TRIED, DAMN IT, I TRIED!). The funny thing about sonnets are they are a well loved form of poetry, even in this over-dominant unrhyming free-verse driven culture . To help I poked my nose in a book, “The Making of a Sonnet” edited by Edward Hirsch and Eavan Boland. These two are sonnet junkies. There’s five centuries worth of sonnets in this anthology from Shakespeare to Robert Frost to Giuseppe to Goethe to Keats to Raine to Pushkin. It’s intense. There’s even an section of sonnets about sonnets. One poem by Edna St. Vincent Millay is entitled “I will put Chaos into fourteen lines”. That is exactly it, chaotic mash up of 14 lines. Hope you enjoy and don’t judge too hard with the lack of pentameter action (I TRIED DAMN IT!)

In the words of my dear friend, happy sonnet reading!

i

the mention of mermaids

STOP COPYING AND PASTING MY POEM

iSTOP COPYING AND PASTING MY POEM

a mountain of spindrift hangs on a wave

both father and son walk still on the shore

no glance nor one word do either men save

this trek on this beach, they’ve walked it before

 i

though younger in age, the son sighs heavy

the father breathes calm, a still and hushed mind

like  water he pours out his heart all too ready

his father receives the tsunami, too kind

 i

but the mention of mermaids, the father recoils

his son, a grown man, still wrapped up in story

“if you would marry a mortal,” father toils

to dismiss away the mythical allegory

“and yet you married mother,” his son said with a whisper

“on this beach”, the man confessed “was the first time I kissed her.”

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